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  • Library Instruction

    Librarians collaborate closely with discipline faculty in order to tailor each session to a specific assignment. We ask that faculty select 2-3 learning outcomes for an initial instruction session. Additional outcomes may be addressed in follow up sessions.

    Below is a listing of each library instruction outcome. Corresponding topics and possible activities are on the next tab. Outcomes 1-7 are basic outcomes while outcomes 7-11 are more specialized or advanced. While librarians may touch on some of the information in other outcomes, we will focus our attention on the outcomes faculty have selected.


    Basic

    Outcome One: Popular vs. Scholarly Articles

    Students will be able to differentiate between scholarly and popular materials in order to select an appropriate mix of resources for a specific assignment.

    Outcome Two: Evaluation of Information

    Students will be able to apply evaluative criteria to a source in order to gauge its credibility/reliability.

    Outcome Three: Research Questions

    Students will be able to develop a research question/questions that is/are appropriate in scope for a specific assignment. 

    Outcome Four: Finding Articles in Library Databases

    Students will be able to construct effective and efficient search strategies in library databases in order to retrieve articles relevant to a specific topic/assignment.

    Outcome Five: Citing Sources

    Students will be able to identify the source components needed for citations in order to accurately cite sources.

    Outcome Six: Plagiarism

    Students will participate in a conversation about plagiarism in order to understand when to cite.

    Outcome Seven: Library/LRC Orientation

    Students will become familiar with LRC services in order to identify and seek help from appropriate resources.


    Advanced/Specialized

    Outcome Eight: Specialized Research Tools

    Students will be able to utilize discipline specific tools in order to be able to locate sources necessary for specialized work.

    Outcome Nine: Primary Sources

    Students will be able to discern between primary and secondary sources in order to select the appropriate source types for their research topic.

    Outcome Ten: Advanced Database Searching

    Students will be able to apply advanced database search strategies in order to locate articles relevant to a specific topic/assignment.

    Outcome Eleven: Scholarship as Conversation

    Students will be able to read a citation and locate its source in order track scholarly work created by others.

    Outcome One: Popular vs. Scholarly Articles

    Students will be able to differentiate between scholarly and popular materials in order to select an appropriate mix of resources for a specific assignment.

    • The differences between scholarly and popular articles with respect to authority, purpose, audience, language, appearance/structure, and documentation
    • Activities could include physical examination and comparison of periodical types

    Outcome Two: Evaluation of Information

    Students will be able to apply evaluative criteria to a source in order to gauge its credibility/reliability.

    • Discuss criteria used to gauge the credibility/reliability of a source
    • Discuss in particular contextual authority
    • Discussion of filter bubbles, echo chambers, and fake news
    • Activities could include in-class evaluation of a source

    Outcome Three: Research Questions

    Students will be able to develop a research question/questions that is/are appropriate in scope for a specific assignment. 

    • Topic narrowing 
    • Using reference resources for topic narrowing
    • Discussion of research as inquiry and strategic exploration
    • Keyword generation before and during the search process
    • Activities could include topic brainstorming, concept mapping, PICO activity (health professions)

    Outcome Four: Finding Articles in Library Databases

    Students will be able to construct effective and efficient search strategies in library databases in order to retrieve articles relevant to a specific topic/assignment.

    • Keyword searching
    • Applying database limiters (e.g. full-text, peer-reviewed)
    • Understanding the search results display
    • Using search connectors (i.e. Boolean) to narrow or broaden a search
    • Additional database tips and tricks (e.g. emailing articles, citations)
    • Activities could include keyword brainstorming, paired or group searching; emailing relevant articles to self or instructors; PICO activity (health professions)

    Outcome Five: Citing Sources

    Students will be able to identify the source components needed for citations in order to accurately cite sources.

    • Purpose of citations
    • Why disciplines use different styles
    • The shortcomings of citation generators
    • Creating accurate in-text citations according to a citation style
    • Creating accurate end-of-text citations according to a citation style
    • Activities could include creating different types of citations in NoodleTools Express; citation game

    Outcome Six: Plagiarism

    Students will participate in a conversation about plagiarism in order to understand when to cite.

    • Define plagiarism and stress that not all plagiarism is intentional
    • Discuss tips for avoiding plagiarism
    • Activities could include a plagiarism game; presentation from Writing Center; paraphrasing activity

    Outcome Seven: Library/LRC Orientation

    Students will become familiar with LRC services in order to identify and seek help from appropriate resources.

    • This outcome is usually reserved for SDV 100 classes, but is also suitable for ENF 1-2 and ESL courses.
    • Activities could include Library Scavenger Hunt; Writing Center orientation

    Outcome Eight: Specialized Research Tools

    Students will be able to utilize discipline specific tools in order to be able to locate sources necessary for specialized work.

    • Differences between multidisciplinary and subject databases and how to choose
    • Introduction to subject databases and specialized resources for course (eg Nursing Reference Center, Gale Literary Resources)
    • Activities could include paired or group searching; emailing relevant articles to self or instructors; PICO activity (health professions)

    Outcome Nine: Primary Sources

    Students will be able to discern between primary and secondary sources in order to select the appropriate source types for their research topic.

    • Types of primary sources
    • Finding primary sources in library databases and online
    • Citing primary sources
    • Activities could include primary source game; College Archives visit; primary sources scavenger hunt

    Outcome Ten: Advanced Database Searching

    Students will be able to apply advanced database search strategies in order to locate articles relevant to a specific topic/assignment.

    • Advanced databases techniques such as subject or index term searching
    • Searching within a specific publication (e.g. searching only articles in the Journal of Social History)
    • Finding specific types of articles (eg literature reviews, book reviews, case studies)
    • Emphasis on interlibrary loan
    • Introduction to Google Scholar
    • Activities could include paired or group searching; group presentations on various database features

    Outcome Eleven: Scholarship as Conversation

    Students will be able to read a citation and locate its source in order track scholarly work created by others.

    • Discussion of scholarship as a conversation
    • Reading bibliographies and deconstructing citations
    • Difference between literature reviews and research articles
    • Tools for locating citations
    • Emphasis on interlibrary loan
    • Activities could include citation tracking; citation game; paired or group searching

    Requests for Library Instruction Sessions

    Requests for instruction sessions should be submitted at least 7 days in advance to ensure availability and to allow adequate time for librarians and faculty to collaborate on session design and learning outcomes.

    Requests may be submitted through the Library Faculty Services page or by contacting the Library in person, via email or phone.  Please allow 2 business days for a response.

    Assignments and Library Instruction

    Library instruction sessions should be timed to coincide with an upcoming research assignment when at all possible.  Students are more likely to be attentive and retain information when they understand how the information relates to a graded assignment.

    Students should be introduced to the research assignment prior to the instruction session and ideally should have a topic in mind when attending the session.

    Details of the research assignment should be shared with librarians at the time of request to allow adequate time for librarians and faculty to collaborate on session design and learning outcomes. Librarians are available to consult with faculty members in designing research assignments.

    Length of Library Instruction Sessions  

    Library instruction sessions are limited to 50-75 minutes depending on the length of the class period and activities planned.   If the faculty member feels more time is necessary they are encouraged to bring the class back for one or more follow up sessions.

    Multiple Sessions

    Faculty members are encouraged to schedule multiple instruction sessions to ensure adequate coverage and reinforcement of concepts.

    Follow up sessions may include the demonstration of more advanced database searching techniques, a focus on citations and plagiarism, or an additional opportunity for students to conduct librarian-assisted research.

    Faculty Attendance

    The instructional faculty member, or a faculty substitute, is required to attend the entire session.

    The presence of the instructional faculty member in the instruction session plays a vital role, impressing upon students the importance of the skills they will be learning.

    Arrival Time

    Faculty members and students are expected to arrive promptly. Classes arriving more than 15 minutes late may be canceled. Instruction sessions will not begin until the faculty member arrives.

        Hampton    Historic Triangle Dual Enrollment

     

    Requests for instruction sessions should be submitted at least 7 days in advance. Please allow 2 business days for a response. 

    Use the calendar below to identify a possible opening (the calendar can be sorted by campus).

     

    Creating Effective Information Literacy & Research Assignments


    • Define the learning outcomes. Make sure your students understand why they are doing the assignment and how they’ll benefit.
    • Base outcomes on one or more of the information literacy competencies. These can easily be adapted to projects in most disciplines.
    • Consider faceted or scaffolded assignments. Break assignments into parts, submitted in sequence.  Students will only do well if they build on what they’ve learned and take into account instructor feedback.
    • Be creative. Consider assignments outside the traditional research paper. This can also help reduce plagiarism.
    • Write clear directions.  Communicate your expectations. Consider creating a rubric.
    • Collaborate with a librarian. We can help find resources to support your assignment and can you keep you up to date on changes that may affect your assignments.
    • Send us a copy of your assignment; we use these assignments as a "heads up" for the librarians working at our research help desk.
    • Test and retest the assignment. Is it doable? Can you complete the assignment with resources/time available to students? Is it up to date? Does it still meet your objectives? 

       

    More Resources for Creating Information Literacy & Research Assignments

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